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The Quad City Area’s Only Group of All Board-Certified
and
Fellowship-Trained Orthopaedic Surgeons

The Quad City Area’s Only Group of All Board-Certified
and
Fellowship-Trained Orthopaedic Surgeons

Hip Arthritis

Symptoms of Hip Arthritis

What Is Hip Arthritis?

Hip Arthritis can occur from wear and tear or may follow injury of the joint. Arthritis is loss of cartilage (cushioning material) between the bones resulting in bone-on-bone contact. Loss of this cartilage results in pain and range of motion is sometimes limited. Although the condition may occur from genetic defects of the cartilage, being overweight can place significant extra stress and discomfort on the hip joints resulting in more debilitating pain and faster progression of the disease.

Non-Surgical Treatments

Mild cases of hip arthritis may be treated with eating healthy foods that promote healthy weight and decreased inflammation, avoiding aggravating activities, using cold and heat packs, taking anti-inflammatories, working with a physical therapist, and/or receiving cortisone injections. While non-surgical treatment can relieve mild cases of the condition, surgery may be necessary if it continues to worsen.

Surgical Treatments

Total Hip Replacement Surgery (Minimally Invasive/Rapid Recovery)

Using a small incision, roughly 2 ½ inches in length, a minimally invasive total hip replacement offers another, more advanced way to address hip arthritis. In addition to a smaller incision, operative time is often as short as one hour and local anesthesia can often be used in lieu of general anesthesia.

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What Typically Happens After Surgery?

Depending on the technique used your experience may vary slightly, but in general, patients can expect to spend minimal time in the hospital, often less than 24 hours. You will be asked to get up and move around soon after the surgery to help the body begin healing. The first few weeks after the operation will require you to modify your daily schedule; however, many individuals find after one to two months they can walk as far as a mile. Swelling and discomfort should gradually lessen over the first few months, and we will make every effort to diminish these effects for your comfort.

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Traditional Open Total Hip Replacement Surgery

The older traditional open Total Hip Replacement surgery requires a large open incision (9 to 12 inches), extensive muscle tissue dissection, the use of general anesthesia, and a 2-3 day hospital stay to monitor pain and recovery from anesthesia. This older traditional method has many disadvantages including potentially large painful scars, long recovery times, and hip motion is often limited.

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